Halibut has long been a favorite among seafood lovers. It can be overwhelming to try and purchase halibut online, as there are so many options, and halibut cost has gone through cycles of high and low prices. Wild Alaskan halibut is currently retailing online for around $30 per pound. These higher prices tend to include shipping, but not always. Definitely worth it to figure out if shipping costs are factored in. If consumers stumble upon lower costs, like $20 per pound, during their search, those prices often come with associated shipping costs.

If you’re in the market for some halibut, the below cost comparison grid should help you. Find a provider that has a seafood option within your budget.

Alaskan Halibut Fillets and Portions

Company Min. Halibut Order Price/lb Shipping* Go To
Global Seafoods 10 lbs $28.50 $16.20
Captain Jack’s Seafood Locker 10 lbs $29.99 FREE
Tanner’s Alaskan Seafood 1 lb $33.95 $46.50
Fulton Fish Market .5 lb $35.00 $20.04
Sizzlefish 3.5lbs $39.70 FREE
Vital Choice 1.5 lbs $54.66 $12.95

What Impacts Price of Halibut Cost Per Pound

The taste, quality, and longer-lasting shelf life of halibut make it an alluring seafood choice for many consumers. Demand for this quality fish has driven prices up in the past.

In order to combat overfishing, the Canadian government introduced a quota system, so halibut fishing now requires a license, looking into catch history and vessel size. The quota system was implemented in 1991 and prices doubled the year following its start. Halibut per pound cost also increased due to the high price of fishing operations due to these intense regulations.

However, these high prices have caused restaurants and fish retailers to steer away from halibut purchases in recent years, and the lack of demand caused prices began to drop again.

Average halibut cost per lb for in-state Alaskan consumers was $5.30 in 2018, and $5.35 in 2019. Shipping to restaurants, retailers, and individual consumers significantly increases halibut fish cost. The global Covid-19 pandemic has stalled lots of international shipping, thus making shippable seafood harder to come by and driving up costs even more.

Alaska’s Pacific halibut enters the U.S. market, and is met with competition from Canada’s Atlantic halibut. There is also additional competition from Norway in the form of farmed halibut fillets that cost around $10 per pound.

Where consumers can buy halibut

  • Grocery stores are an easy way to purchase halibut on a case-by-case basis, for last-minute dinners or gatherings. If consumers are interested in buying bulk, it might be better to join a club.
  • Purchasing halibut online through retailers makes the process simple and straightforward. Finding a consistent or favorite retailer might even inspire a happy customer to create a buying club.
  • Buying clubs are an organized group of people that purchase bulk seafood together, the amount depends on where the club purchases from, but typically 150-250 pounds minimum, an amazing way to get high quality seafood for a lower price. Buying in bulk would be a great way to lower halibut cost. There is also the option to purchase halibut in addition to other seafood favorites. Most companies urge clubs to order before fishing season.
  • Fish markets can be a lovely way to find consistent halibut supply and competitive market prices. Make sure to keep an eye out for what type of halibut is available, as aquaculture is taking off for some kinds of halibut. Fishing for wild halibut in the Pacific is still quite lucrative and fish farming for halibut has not quite taken off. This is due in part to responsible management of wild Pacific halibut, but Atlantic halibut fisheries are shifting toward aquaculture alternatives.